Episode 4 - Inside the XPR: How to win in the stock market.



The Winchester XPR’s stock incorporates textured gripping surfaces.

The stock on any rifle is the essential human interface between the gun and the shooter. If it fits you well, your entire shooting experience is enhanced. If it fits poorly, or if it allows the receiver to twist when fired, or the barrel to rub, well, that’s obviously not a good thing.

The XPR rifle’s advanced polymer stock comes in your choice of subdued black and several popular camo finishes. The stock’s textured panels located on the forearm and pistol grip help improve your grip in cold, wet weather. The forearm has rounded edges plus a slightly flattened bottom profile for more comfortable shooting from any position. This flattened profile also optimizes stability when you’re firing off sandbags or a bench rest. 


The Winchester XPR’s stock has interface surfaces that precisely mate to the underside of the receiver.

A critical feature of any high-powered rifle is how the action and barrel are set in the stock. The XPR rifle’s receiver nestles onto molded interface pads and into a cross-mounted recoil lug to resist flexing and recoil torque twist when firing. This is the same recoil lug system used on custom grade European match rifles costing thousands of dollars. This means your XPR will hold its zero under the most adverse conditions.


The Inflex Technology recoil pad on the Winchester XPR’s stock soaks up felt recoil.

The Inflex Technology recoil pad has several specially shaped internal rib structures that help redirect the recoil impulse. This redirection moves the comb down and away from your face under recoil so your perception of recoil (often called felt recoil) is greatly reduced. This ideally contoured contact area on the XPR rifle offers optimal protection, even when shooting today’s hard hitting and hard recoiling magnum loads. (So your can say goodbye to comb rash on your cheek and to recoil-induced flinching.)


As you can see, the stock in the XPR from Winchester Repeating Arms is more than a rifle handle, it’s really a precision shooter interface - because Winchester Knows Bolts!



Read the entire 5-part series plus the introduction: "Winchester Knows Bolt Actions."


Copyright Winchester Repeating Arms, 2017. Written by WRA staff writer Scott Engen. Photos copyright by Winchester Repeating Arms, or Olin company archives,  in the public domain or as indicated in the caption.