Utah Artist Commemorates 150 Years of Winchester.


Winchester has been combining art and function for 150 years. For those of us who love firearms, we especially appreciate how beautiful and artistic the wood and steel become when brought together in a rifle like the Winchester 1866 Yellow Boy. The Mark Goodson painting (shown) takes the concept one step further. 

Mr. Goodson, a local artist living near the Winchester Repeating Arms headquarters in Utah requested the opportunity to honor the 1866 Winchester and to help celebrate 150 years of Winchester history by doing a this special painting. The result is exquisite in every way. Goodson lives north of our offices in a town called Huntsville, Utah and is a noted, award-winning fine artist, working mostly in oils. When you view his portfolio you will see that his choice of subjects is very eclectic. But living in rural Huntsville, with a family legacy rooted in the West, it was logical choice for him to tackle this project. Here are the particulars:

  • Title: Yellow Boy, Winchester 66
  • Medium: Oil on canvas
  • Size of painting: 15"x10"
  • Size of frame: 18"x 13"
  • Price (as framed): Please contact Mr. Goodson directly.

The Model 1866  as shown is period accurate, as is the ammunition box of Winchester cartridges. Both were provided to the artist for the painting. The rifle itself is a classic version of the Model 1866, but is actually a new limited edition/historic unegraved reproduction. Only the highly engraved versions are all that are currently in the line. 

Photo of fine art painting by Mark Goodson
Photo of fine art painting by Mark Goodson, used with permission.

Images on this page are copyright Mark Goodson 2016.

The Model 1866  as shown is period accurate, as is the ammunition box of Winchester cartridges. Both were provided to the artist for the painting. The rifle itself is a classic version of the Model  1866, but is actually a new limited edition/historic version not yet available from Winchester Repeating Arms.

The history of the ammo box. The artist was given the opportunity to un-box an athentic, full box of 50 rounds of 150-year-old 44 caliber Henry rimfire cartridges. An interesting historic note is that this exact cartridge box design and ammo was produced for the Henry Company and then the name on the box was changed to Winchester Repeating Arms Co.  and the rifle name changed as a running change in production when the company was officially created. It had the identical look, size and color -- just the company name and rifle changed. 

The original, full box of 44 rimfire Henry cartridges was found sealed inside a platered wall in a home in Salt Lake City in the early 1970s and was in very good condition at the time it was found.  The history of the ammunition production at the transition to Winchester Repeating Arms is complex, and input from historians is always appreciated. 


Goodson also painted a close-up version of the original box of ammo, with the Henry's Repeating Rifle inscription. The Winchester inscription is was created exactly as they appeared when Winchester began producing the ammunition for the Winchester 1866, which coincided with the end of production for the Henry version.

Mr. Goodson is no relation to famed artist Phillip R. Goodwin, except, possibly in spirit. Goodwin is the painter of the iconic Winchester Horse and Rider. If you are interested in great western art and Winchester specific art read more by clicking or tapping here. 


Images above copyright Mark Goodson 2016. They may not be used or reproduced in any way without written permission of Mark Goodson. Article copyright Winchester Repeating Arms, 2016. Images of the paintings are used with specific permission from Mr. Goodson. BY RBStitt